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with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
% of poll, only americans think that control is an important problem mostly economy in general, 24% think that is most important. federal budget deficit and federal debt is 11%. here is the front page of "the new york daily news," -- lindsay is an independent here in washington d.c.. you are on "washington journal." am really sad and i want to make sure if one does in this country that 31,000 people per year are killed by guns. this is a normal and we did this is a horrible number for its allies civilization. horrible number for a civilization. stronger gun laws can make a difference. calling in.you for this is the front page of " the washington times." michael is from rockville center, new york. caller: the reason this legislation failed is not only would it have not prevented the terrible tragedy that occurred in connecticut but also the tragedy in colorado. abroad is lacking because it would appear both parties have used this issue to raise money and at the same time not really address it responsibly. i think most americans are on to the fact that would appear you bringin -- that what
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
immigration can affect the u.s. economy. a hearing on friday. then on monday a second hearing. after that we have to see how the process unfolds. especially republicans on the judiciary committee are calling for more than the currently scheduled hearings. probably sometime in early may we will move to the markup process which is where the senators on the judiciary committee can begin offering amendments and releasing how they want to continue to shape the bill. we hope it gets passed out of committee and go to the senate floor. host: rebekah kaplan of the national journal. wilmington, north carolina, kathleen is on our democrat line. is roberta our guest aplan.rebecca caller: my biggest fear is that our country is in a state of fear. thing wehe worst could ever have as americans. we have based our country from the beginning of a great work ethic. there are so many things we could do instead of being frightened every time something happens. domestically, foreman, and immigration. we have a statue of liberty that does welcome everybody. i believe that we should give some amnesty, because of am
for the u.s. economy. dramatically.at we discovered our immigration system had failed. a number of these individuals should have been allowed into the united states. there was a lot soul-searching about how to correct these problems. the number of visitors to the united states went down dramatically. we have put in place systems in terms oftty good screening. we're trying to have the best of both worlds. we want to encourage people to come to our country. we want to be able to keep up those who are likely to do was this kind of harm. it is a balancing act. the perfect from becoming the enemy of the good? guest: in an open country like the united states, we always have been, you cannot have perfect security. it doesn't mean you cannot do better. host: denver from new mexico. from mexico. caller: i would like to make a comment about the borders. terroristic camps popping up everywhere. again and ages form in these other places that is hard to reach. they are training on the mexico sied states. they are, across our borders -- they are coming across our borders. they are getting aro
currently in our country illegally. many have been here for years and contributing to our economy. knowing who they are is critical to public safety. it must be evidence from the outset there is a pathway to citizenship that will be fair and a tenable. .- fair and attainable dreamers and immigrant farm workers will also be included. those who complete the requirements will be able to achieve lawful status more quickly. the bill will improve our legal immigration system. visas.ses the cap on thes it continues to protect vulnerable immigrants. it creates new temporary worker programs while protecting american workers. businesses must be able to maintain a stable legal workforce if our economy is to continue to grow. this will pressure on the border and reduce illegal flows. the majority of americans support these common sense steps. we are ready to implement them. we can and we will achieve the core provisions of the bill. we stand ready to work with the congress to achieve this important goal. the introduction of this legislation is indeed a milestone. i look forward to continue to working
can live with that. many people believe this will make our information and economy quite safer. is a: catherine lotrionte professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. host: coming up, we will talk about an investigation into the gaps and oversight of compound pharmacies. today is saturday, april 20. we will be right back. >> i strongly urge you to come up with a number that tells this committee and the american people -- we have a responsibility as well. for you to say, we're just going to see how things turn out, he will determine the size of the 2014 force, i believe is a tragic and terrible this date for which we may pay a very heavy price -- mistake for which we may pay a very heavy price. tosenator, i didn't say leave it completely vague. we are advising and assisting at the battalion level. were going to lift off at the brigade level this fall. the 2014 number is inextricably linked to the number we believe we need to provide to assist post 2014. >> you have to wait till 201
in the current state of the economy. this is from fall of 2012. we will see if that changes post-boston and if those numbers go up. this goes to the earlier segment that you aired, this idea that the united states is complacent with respect to terrorism. i think the survey demonstrates it is among the things that iople think about your it also think that the law enforcement community is certainly not complacent when it comes to terrorism. the boston event was a security event. there's a lot of individuals covering that event, from federal, state and local. i don't think that boston happened due to complacency. i don't think we necessarily are complacent. i think we have accepted terrorism as a new facet of our reality, albeit one that does not happen that frequently. host: if you want to look at the start.u you can go to m.d.edd.edu to get more informa. nationaliff, from the consortium for the study of terrorism & responses to terrorism. caller: good morning. i think these turbo crimes are quite separate. two crimes are quite separate. the man in connecticut was concerning his di
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8